Wildlands is Well-Versed in Helping Clients Fund Projects With Grants

“Wildlands’ experience and technical expertise was invaluable to Catawba Land Conservancy’s 2020 NCLWF restoration grant application. Wildlands worked with us to develop the site vision and communicated the existing site deficiencies, design, and ecological gains in a clear, concise application that resulted in the award of funds.”

Sean Bloom, Biologist and GIS Director | Catawba Lands Conservancy

 

As a vertically integrated ecological restoration firm, our municipal clients often call upon us to assist in securing critical project funding by identifying applicable grants, grant application writing, conceptual design creation, and developing funding strategies to leverage multiple funding sources. Wildlands has a successful track record of applying for, receiving, and implementing water resource grants for municipalities, recently including City of Charlotte, Hendersonville, Black Mountain, Morganton, and Woodfin, NC; Greenville, SC; and for non-profits, such as MountainTrue, RiverLink, Mainspring Conservation Trust, and the Catawba Lands Conservancy. These grants have included the NC Land and Water Fund (LWF), EPA Section 319, the Environmental Enhancement Grant (EEG), DWR’s Water Resources Development Grant (WRG), the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grants, Section 205j, and other public and private grant funding sources. Wildlands has also assisted with non-grant funding programs like the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF), which is a low-interest loan available to local governments. READ MORE

Spring has sprung, including unwanted invasive plants!

Invasive plant species pose a serious threat to native riparian plant communities. Furthermore, some invasive plants, such as autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata), fix atmospheric nitrogen and release it into the soil where it readily leaches into waterbodies. Many invasive plant populations can be found in riparian buffers throughout North Carolina. Invasive plant populations can often be successfully controlled using a variety of mechanical & chemical techniques. Large advances in native plant community success can typically be made in one to two years of invasive plant control efforts. Wildlands’ Land Stewardship Team has the skills and knowledge to identify and safely treat invasive species around aquatic environments.

While woody invasive species are best treated in the fall when they send nutrients to their roots to prepare for winter, herbaceous plants are best treated during the growing season before they set seed.  Below are just a few common invasive herbaceous plants that are best controlled in the spring.

 

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